Judgment Day

I Am Cursed!

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(Thomas Doolittle, “Love to Christ Necessary to Escape the Curse at His Coming!” 1693)

“If any man does not love the Lord Jesus Christ–let him be Anathema! (or accursed).” 1 Corinthians 16:22

To be Anathema is to be cursed really–sentenced to real pains and real torments. These will be . . .
so great,
so grievous,
so many,
so extreme,
so continual,
and so universal–
that they shall wring out a confession from you: “Now I am accursed indeed!

To lie in these flames which cannot be quenched, to burn in this fire in which I cannot be consumed–is such a curse, and so intolerable, that will make you curse the day in which you were born, and curse the time you ever lived in this world–because not better improved, to escape that curse you lie under in Hell.

You shall cry out and roar, “Woe is me–a poor miserable wretch! I am tormented in this place, and cannot have one drop of water to refresh and cool my parched tongue! Woe is me–a poor cursed scoundrel! I am in pain–in extremity of pain–and have no ease! Alas! I toss and tumble in this bed of flames, and cannot rest! If I wander from one side of Hell unto another–I cannot find one corner where I might have a little rest! Oh! cursed creature, that I did not love Christ! If I had loved Christ as much above the world, as I loved the world above Christ–then I might have been among the blessed saints, and not in the midst of such a cursed crew! Had I loved Christ so much more than sin, as I loved sin more than Christ–then I might have been a blessed one. But because I did not love Christ–I am now this cursed wretch! I am as cursed as cursed can be! I was told that, for lack of love to Christ–this would be my accursed state. And now, for lack of love to Jesus–it is my accursed state forever! I was told that if I do not love Christ–I would be Anathema! I did not love Christ–and now I am Anathema!”

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Why Do Most People Believe in Works-Based Salvation?

dig-a-holeThe simple answer is that salvation by works seems right in the eyes of man. One of man’s basic desires is to be in control of his own destiny, and that includes his eternal destiny. Salvation by works appeals to man’s pride and his desire to be in control. Being saved by works appeals to that desire far more than the idea of being saved by faith alone. Also, man has an inherent sense of justice. Even the most ardent atheist believes in some type of justice and has a sense of right and wrong, even if he has no moral basis for making such judgments. Our inherent sense of right and wrong demands that if we are to be saved, our “good works” must outweigh our “bad works.” Therefore, it is natural that when man creates a religion it would involve some type of salvation by works.

Because salvation by works appeals to man’s sinful nature, it forms the basis of almost every religion except for biblical Christianity. Proverbs 14:12 tells us that “there is a way that seems right to a man, but its end is the way of death.” Salvation by works seems right to men, which is why it is the predominantly held viewpoint. That is exactly why biblical Christianity is so different from all other religions—it is the only religion that teaches salvation is a gift of God and not of works. “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God—not by works, so that no one can boast” (Ephesians 2:8–9).

Another reason why salvation by works is the predominantly held viewpoint is that natural or unregenerate man does not fully understand the extent of his own sinfulness or of God’s holiness. Man’s heart is “deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked” (Jeremiah 17:9), and God is infinitely holy (Isaiah 6:3). The deceit of our hearts is the very thing that colors our perception of the extent of that deceit and is what prevents us from seeing our true state before a God whose holiness we are also unable to fully comprehend. But the truth remains that our sinfulness and God’s holiness combine to make our best efforts as “filthy rags” before a holy God (Isaiah 64:6; cf. 6:1–5).

The thought that man’s good works could ever balance out his bad works is a totally unbiblical concept. Not only that, but the Bible also teaches that God’s standard is nothing less than 100 percent perfection. If we stumble in keeping just one part of God’s righteous law, we are as guilty as if we had broken all of it (James 2:10). Therefore, there is no way we could ever be saved if salvation truly were dependent on works.

Another reason that salvation by works can creep into denominations that claim to be Christian or say they believe in the Bible is that they misunderstand passages like James 2:24: “You see then that a man is justified by works, and not by faith only.” Taken in the context of the entire passage (James 2:14–26), it becomes evident that James is not saying our works make us righteous before God; instead, he is making it clear that real saving faith is demonstrated by good works. The person who claims to be a Christian but lives in willful disobedience to Christ has a false or “dead” faith and is not saved. James is making a contrast between two different types of faith—truth faith that saves and false faith that is dead.

There are simply too many verses that teach that one is not saved by works for any Christian to believe otherwise. Titus 3:4–5 is one of many such passages: “But when the kindness and the love of God our Savior toward man appeared, not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to His mercy He saved us, through the washing of regeneration and renewing of the Holy Spirit.” Good works do not contribute to salvation, but they will always be characteristic of one who has been born again. Good works are not the cause of salvation; they are the evidence of it.

While salvation by works might be the predominantly held viewpoint, it is not an accurate one biblically. The Bible contains abundant evidence of salvation by grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone (Ephesians 2:8–9).

https://www.gotquestions.org/

Can the Punishment Be Too Great?

Erta-ale_lac-de-lave_2001.jpgWhat punishment then can be too great–for so great an evil?

(Ralph Venning, “The Plague of Plagues!” 1669)

The worst on this side of Hell, is mercy–and the worst of and in Hell, is but justice!

Cain could say that his punishment was intolerable–but he could not say that it was unjust.
Though his punishment was greater than he could bear–yet it was not greater than he deserved.

Repeatedly, when the judgments of God are spoken of in Revelation, they are said always to be just and trueand righteous (Revelation 15:3; 16:7). Though God’s ways are unsearchable–yet they are true and just and righteous.

Death is but the due wages of sin (Romans 6:23). Therefore it is said, “Their damnation is just!” (Romans 3:8). Every sin has its just punishment (Hebrews 2:2).

Consider the nature of sin. It is Deicide–God-murder! Thus it is just for God to do with sinners, what they would unjustly do with Him. That is, take away from them all good and glory, displease and destroy them–because they would do so to Him.

If sin had accomplished its intention and desire–horror of horrors!–God would have been no more!

If we consider the person who is sinned against, and that the aim of sin is to ungod God–then what punishment can be thought bad enough?

Sin is an infinite evil. What punishment then can be too great–for so great an evil?

As none but infinite power can pardon sin–so none but infinite power can punish it sufficiently.

Just as sin’s aim is infinite–so is its desert. Therefore, though sin’s punishment is infinite–yet it is but just.
Seeing sin contains all evil–it is fitting that its punishment should be answerable and proportionate.

Praying in Concentrations Camps?

 

We’d better concentrate on praying (to God in repentance) or we will praying in concentration camps. God will deliver us in the Western Hemisphere to our enemies and then we’ll have much to cry out to Him for.

Pay No Attention to That Fool

Cetema.cereris.possibly(A.T. Pierson)

Some time ago, an infidel got up in the presence of some atheistic companions, and defied the God of heaven to show Himself in battle. He swung his sword to and fro, and challenged the Almighty to meet him in single combat. 

The Almighty paid no attention to him, of course—but He just commissioned a little gnat, so small that it could scarcely be seen, to lodge in his windpipe and choke him to death!

“The fool says in his heart, ‘There is no God.’ They are corrupt, their deeds are vile.” Psalm 14:1

Except Ye Repent, Ye Shall All Likewise Perish

Brooklyn_Museum_-_The_Tower_of_Siloam_(Le_tour_de_Siloë)_-_James_TissotLuke 13

1 There were present at that season some that told him of the Galilaeans, whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices.

And Jesus answering said unto them, Suppose ye that these Galilaeans were sinners above all the Galilaeans, because they suffered such things?

I tell you, Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish.

Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them, think ye that they were sinners above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem?

I tell you, Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish.

Just because bad things happen to people and you think that they must have deserved it, is wrong. All mankind are sinners and deserve death. This being the case straight from the Master’s own mouth, REPENT! or you will likewise perish.

That Portion That Will Never Be Taken Away

The CurveLest we awake to find that we are paupers forevermore!

(J.C. Ryle)

“Only one thing is needed. Mary has chosen what is better, and it will not be taken away from her.” Luke 10:41-42

We should observe what a high commendation our Lord Jesus Christ pronounced on Mary’s choice. There was a deep meaning in these words. They were spoken not only for Mary’s sake, but for the sake of all Christ’s believing people in every part of the world. They were meant to encourage all true Christians . . .
to be single-eyed and whole-hearted,
to follow the Lord fully,
to walk closely with God,
to make soul-business immeasurably their first business, and
to think comparatively little of the things of this fleeting world.

The true Christian’s portion is the grace of God. It is the only good thing which is substantial, satisfying, real, and lasting. The grace of God is . . .
better in sickness–and better in health,
better in youth–and better in old age,
better in adversity–and better in prosperity,
better in life–and better in death,
better in time–and better in eternity.
No circumstance and no position can be imagined, in which it is not better for man to have the grace of God.

The true Christian’s possession shall never be taken from him.
He alone, of all mankind, shall never be stripped of his inheritance.
Kings must one day leave their palaces.
Rich men must one day leave their money and lands–they only hold them until they die.

But the poorest saint on earth has a treasure of which he will never be deprived. The grace of God, and the favor of Christ–are riches which no man can take from him. They will go with him to the grave when he dies. They will rise with him in the resurrection morning, and be his to all eternity!

What do we know of this “better part” which Mary chose? Have we chosen it for ourselves? Can we say with truth that it is ours? Let us never rest until we can. Let us choose life, while Christ offers it to us without money and without price. Let us seek treasure in Heaven–lest we awake to find that we are paupers forevermore!